Don’t Kiss Them Goodbye

Author:  Allison DuBois
ISBN:  978-0743282284

I admit to being a fan of the television show “Medium” and, one night, whilst surfing the internet, I stumbled across Allison DuBois’s website.   I’ve always held a fascination about those psychics/mediums who work with police (and other governmental) departments and it was interesting to read more about the woman who inspired the television show I enjoyed.   I was excited to see that Allison had written books about her experiences, so I acquired one through a book swapping site.

I started reading this book last Friday on my way to work and, by the end of my shift, I had finished it.   Its an easy read this book, with large font and written at a level so a primary school child could understand.   Its not a work of great literature and its obvious Allison (and Joe) have written the text themselves, but I think that adds to the books appeal.  I have seen where some readers have complained about the dryness of book, but Allison herself admits to distancing herself emotionally from her clients and their predicaments, as a professional necessity, so I was comfortable with this aspect of her style.

I also read complaints from reviewers, who were big fans of the television shows, about there not being enough about those cases which were the inspiration for various episodes.  This seemed odd to me.  Knowing that Allison works in the legal field, I can see the problems associated with giving details of the “real life” cases in which she has participated.  Anyone whose case she came into contact with might find grounds for appeal based on her involvement and, given the nature of the cases on which Allison works, it would be foolish for her to divulge this information.  In fact, I think she mentions this in the book.     Also, one has to consider the privacy of the victim’s families in these cases: giving out details in a book (from which profits will be made – let’s face reality here) would be in poor taste, in my opinion.  I think Allison holds herself to a much higher ethical and moral standard myself.  Certainly, she gives this impression in the book.

Again, some found this book preachy, I found it comforting.   Only in those instances where she had been granted permission by the client did Allison provide details of her work.   I liked her approach to each client: taking into account what they might need to know and what might benefit them, or the case, rather than just blurting out details that might be painful to hear and added nothing to an investigation.    In many instances, Allison did provide comfort merely by the choice of the information she divulged.

The book is packed with examples of her work, despite what you might read from other reviewers.   Allison also provides hints and tips for help with those children that might show signs of mediumship, regardless of whether they want to develop their skills or not.   The book was a little dull, sticking to the facts, but I have come to expect that from writers from the legal fields who need to stick to the facts and so I still enjoyed this book.

I found it fascinating and will endeavour to read Allison DuBois’s other books, “We are Their Heaven: Why the Dead Never Leave Us” and “Secrets of the Monarch: What the Dead can Teach Us about Living a Better Life“.  I hope to find them just as honest and informative.

Rating:  3½/5.

Leave a comment

Filed under Books

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s